National News

Obama heads back to Washington facing Iraq choice

President Barack Obama, waves to the after delivering his commencement address to the graduates of University of California, Irvine, at the Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif., Saturday, June 14, 2014. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) -
President Barack Obama, waves to the after delivering his commencement address to the graduates of University of California, Irvine, at the Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif., Saturday, June 14, 2014. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
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By Nedra Pickler, The Associated Press

RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. - Wrapping up a weekend away with his family, U.S. President Barack Obama was returning to Washington Monday faced with an impending choice on how to act to stop violent insurgents bringing chaos to Iraq.

The White House said Obama got several updates on the crisis in phone calls from National Security Adviser Susan Rice during his weekend stay with his wife, daughter Malia and friends in the Palm Springs area. Obama said as he left for the trip Friday that he told his national security team to come up with options for U.S. assistance to deal with the worst instability in Iraq since the U.S. withdrawal in 2011.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Rice's telephone briefings included updates on developments in Iraq, options being discussed for action and the movement of some staff out of the embassy in Baghdad amid the threat posed by the al-Qaida inspired insurgency.

Obama said Friday that he would take several days to review a wide range of options for action in Iraq, although he ruled out the possibility of sending in American ground troops. Administration officials said other options being weighed include strikes using drones or manned aircraft, as well as boosts in surveillance and intelligence gathering, including satellite coverage and other monitoring efforts.

Obama said the violence "should be a wake-up call" to the Iraqi government to improve sectarian relations and improve its security force. "We can't do it for them. And in the absence of this type of political effort, short-term military action, including any assistance we might provide, won't succeed," Obama said.

Iraqi leaders have been pleading with the U.S. for additional help to combat the insurgency for more than a year. While the U.S. has sold Iraq military equipment, the Obama administration has resisted drone strikes.

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Follow Pickler at http://twitter.com/nedrapickler

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